Yoga & Mindfulness

Tatyana incorporates numerous mind-body-spirit approaches in her psychotherapy work, in addition to public and private instruction offerings. 

What is Hatha-Raja yoga?

Hatha yoga includes various physical techniques including postures (asana), breath work (pranayama), and mental concentration.

Raja yoga encompasses all 8 limbs of yoga, providing a path for physical wellness, mental clarity, self discipline, peace. That path guides discovering our true self, and our non-separate nature.

The foundation of yoga is our ethical conduct, the first step of which is Ahimsa: non-harming. It is a call to not only refrain from inflicting discomfort upon others, but rather to take action to prevent and relieve suffering. 

What is Mindfulness?

Simply, mindfulness is a present-focused attention with qualities of kindness and non-judgement.

The practice brings perspective and clarity, rebooting from our old conditioning. We learn how to see the humanity in our life journey and also experience an inner freedom, without shifting away from what may uncomfortable or hard to look at. It is a practice of curious inquiry into the present moment, which allows us to be with what is right before us and hold it with compassion. 

Hatha-Raja yoga

What is Buddhist Psychology?

Buddhist psychology is at its core a science of the mind, yet offers a very different lens than western, medical-based psychology.

It encompassess the universal and the individual perspective on life: that which in our experience is individual and that which is collective. It is cultivated as a philosophy of life rather than a religious doctrine, appealing to both those seeking secular frameworks or complimentary to their faith.

At its core are practices of directing attention and integration of buddhist principles into daily living. These tools help us to recognize states we may experience that are unhealthy and those that are healthy (and are more likely to lead to skillful means). In Thich Nhat Hanh’s tradition, this is termed “engaged Buddhism” and otherwise becomes “compassion in action.” 

Lived Experience

Tatyana’s introduction to yoga started as a child in the former soviet union.

After coming to the United States, she was exposed to buddhist meditations before beginning a long journey into Chinese martial arts in San Diego, CA. The onset of physical health issues required her to rapidly switch away from intense practice at the peak of her training to more subtle, meditative and energetic studies of meditation and qi-gong. She later moved her energy into dance, becoming an argentine tango instructor throughout college and mambo performer.

During her graduate studies in Virginia, Tatyana became a consistent student of yoga, which greatly shifted in form upon moving to Wyoming given limited access.

There, Tatyana became a member, and subsequently a co-facilitator, of the Windy Moon Sangha in the tradition of vietnamese Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh. She helped with putting on the University of Wyoming day of mindfulness retreat and began incorporating mindfulness into psychotherapy. She attended several retreats including with Dharma Teachers Chan Huy, Larry Ward and Peggy Rowe, and spent 10 days at the Deer Park Monastery. Tatyana additionally completed two professional trainings in Mindfulness Based Relapse Prevention with Dr. Sarah Bowen, using this method in a novel application for treating non-suicidal self-injury. 

Mindfulness

Upon moving to Durham, NC she returned to the study and practice of yoga. Tatyana became certified in Mind Body Centering Yoga with Nina Be (200 hr) and completed an additional training (300 hrs) on topics including trauma-sensitive yoga, restorative yoga, and the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh. Following years of waiting for the opportunity, she went on to study with Sri Dharma Mittra and the advanced teachers of the Dharma Yoga Center. She is a Dharma Yoga Registered Teacher (200/500) and is in progress for advanced trainings (LOAY 700 hr & 1000 hr).

Tatyana translates the culmination of her experiences to teach in informal settings, such as in stand-up meetings at disaster relief operations, to formal workshops and corporate wellness trainings. She has taught yoga, mindfulness, and tools for self-healing for women serving prison time in Raleigh for several years. She periodically offers classes through Global Breath Studio in Durham, NC, substitute teaches for the Dharma Yoga Center, and regularly teaches classes as part of Project Yes both in person and online. Aside from teaching a complete practice in Dharma Yoga, she particularly enjoys teaching pranayama, meditation, and yoga nidra. Her own practice is a lifelong journey of self-realization and ever-deepening what it means to be compassionate. 

"DR TATYANA KHOLODKOV is a knowledgable advocate for all sources of support for all people! She is an endlessly present guide for healthy living and generosity of spirit. She is wise and always looking to learn more ways to expand her capacity."

Nina Be - Mind Body Centring Yoga

Be more Mindful

Excellent all around on so many levels. Perfect mix of asana and pranayama. Teacher has excellent level of knowledge about advanced poses and how to move in and out safely as well as hints about focusing attention. Creative flow used as well as variety in postures that aren't typically in a usual class flow. Appropriate level of spiritual direction and suggestions. Perhaps one of the best teachers I've ever experienced!

Be more Mindful

I loved how supportive Tatyana was in encouraging us to try new poses or variations and it was okay if it didn't work out, and at the same time did not push us to do anything too far beyond our body's limit. I liked the focus on the mental and meditative aspect, which is what I love about yoga - so many yoga classes seem more like exercise classes these days, but this class seemed like it truly embraced the full experience of yoga.

Want to be more mindful?

Here's some simple tips for helping you Be More Mindful in Your Day.